Guest of Honor

Responsive image

2017

Madrid

(Nov 25 - Dec 3)

Madrid is a massive metropolis surpassed only by Île-de-France and Greater London, with an expanse that supports efficient communication structures and secures its place in the international lineup of great cities.
Madrid is a dynamic city, led by local authorities who aren’t afraid to abandon traditional political structures in favor of creating social alternatives that redistribute power through community-oriented relationships.
It is an enterprising city where artists, activists, musicians, writers, associations and societies commit to strategies in support of social change. Madrid offers all this through the FIL for a global audience.

Feel the Light!

Light is Madrid’s distinguishing feature—light that streams into its streets, its culture … and especially, its people. Light is what gives life to the Madrid’s social fabric and makes it one of the friendliest cities in the world. Its heat draws millions of visitors annually who seek to share in the lives and enthusiasm of its inhabitants.

Light is an essential part of Madrid’s makeup: from the lay of the land (the Puerta del Sol), to its popular culture (“de Madrid al Cielo”), to its art history—from Velázquez to Antonio López—and in the brilliant linguistic renewal of the avant-garde in the twentieth century. When we observe, we need more than material light to illuminate our ideas. We also need the light of understanding that makes us ‘see’ in a special way: it is this light that defines each culture based on common value systems.

Light has also attracted creators from the other side of the Atlantic, in a back and forth trend that became fundamental as the twentieth century evolved. And just what do we aim to reactivate with the presence of Madrid at FIL this 2017? There are, after all, other connotations for Madrid that are associated with light. In 1943 León Felipe’s book You Won the Light was published in Mexico where Felipe was in exile. Like so many other intellectuals and artists, Spaniards—and in particular people from Madrid— continue to exchange their creativity in an exercise of continuous fertilization, illuminated from Guadalajara, for all of Latin America.